Skellboy Rattles His Bones Onto Switch

Skippy the warrior skeleton didn’t want to come back to life.  He was perfectly ok with being dead, which is a much worse situation to be in from the living side of things, but then a necromancer went a little crazy in the Cubold Kingdom and brought him back to life.  What the necromancer was actually going for was an army of mindless undead minions to rain destruction on the kingdom but he accidentally revived a hero while he was at it, and now Skippy has a mission- defeat the necromancer and get back to his eternal rest.

The thing about skeletons, though, is they’re not held together by much, which makes it easy to swap out parts.  Skellboy is a cute action romp through the Cubold Kingdom, hacking up enemies with a variety of weaponry and sometimes using their dropped appendages as body upgrades.  The body parts come in feet, torso, and head versions, all three of which can have their own perks and abilities.  A plant head might let Skippy shoot seeds, for example, while bat feet give a nice speed boost.  It doesn’t take long before there isn’t a single original section of the skeleton body left, but seeing as it’s the same consciousness driving the assemblage of parts it works out ok.  After a short period of exploration new weapons start showing up as well, such as a pencil-spear that can be thrown and a club useful for breaking up bits of scenery.  It’s not the deepest combat system around but there’s some nice variety in there, and the regular upgrades plus some light platforming and secrets to chase after keep Skellboy moving along at a nice pace.

Skellboy released today but it does come with a small disclaimer, in that there’s a patch scheduled for next week that will provide some nice performance improvements and squash a few bugs.  It’s a charming, fun action-romp that’s instantly likeable, but Skellboy also isn’t done yet which is why this isn’t a review.  For right now Skellboy is released and fully playable, charming from start to finish and decked out in a great visual style, but there’s still a little more work to do before it’s in its best shape.